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Mineral County Schools 36 Baker Place, Keyser, WV 26726            Phone: 304-788-4200            Fax: 304-788-4204

Basic Instructional Program

Basic Instructional Program
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

The early childhood education program in Mineral County includes all students in grades K-4 who are, in general, from five to ten years of age.

THE LEARNER

The rate and potential for learning are greatest during the early years of a child’s life. By the time a child is five, more things have been learned than will ever be learned in the same number of years again.

Young children learn through direct experience, active experimentation, and manipulation. Their five senses give them strong learning reinforcement. The responses of adults and their peers give them signals that affect learning.

Five-year-olds must be active. They do not have long attention spans and are often optically far-sighted. They ask many questions and are beginning to notice differences in shapes, sizes, quantities, and qualities of concrete objects and materials. They are interested in language. Vocabularies are growing and they enjoy talking with other children.

PHILOSOPHY

The kindergarten program is a sequence of learning experiences planned specifically for five-year-olds. The program is based on principles of child development and stresses the involvement of learners in concrete experiences prior to the introduction of abstract symbols and concepts.

Teachers and para-professionals who work with early childhood should be especially prepared and should exhibit skill in understanding the growth and development of young children. A planned program for early education should provide for a close relationship between child teachers to insure a positive self-image in the child. Early identification of special needs will make a significant contribution to the elimination of long-term remediation.

Since kindergarten represents the initial contact between the school and many parents, it is essential to establish good rapport. Parents should be regularly and continuously involved with the early education program for their child.

EDUCATIONAL GOALS

The kindergarten program fosters self-awareness and a positive self-concept and

Helps the five-year-old to develop:

      1. language skills
      2. social skills
      3. cognitive skills
      4. growth and fine motor skills and self-help skills
      5. decision-making and problem-solving skills
    1. Skill development will be investigative, experiential and at a readiness or aware-ness level. There will be child development, non-academic approach to instruction.

The program provides opportunities for:

      1. creative expression
      2. enrichment experiences both in and out of the classroom

The kindergarten program encourages strong home-school interaction and communication for the optimum success of each student. Home visitation is an integral part of the kindergarten program and an important link with the home. Teachers will visit each student’s home twice during the school year. Home visits meet learning outcomes and are instructional in nature.

THE LEARNER

Physically, children develop very rapidly during the ages of three to seven. Girls generally develop more rapidly in small muscle coordination, while boys are ahead in gross motor development. Physical development is less rapid during ages seven to ten..

Mentally, children develop approximately 50% of their intelligence in the first four years of life, with another 30% developed during ages five to eight. They develop from the pre-operational stage (ages three to seven) through the concrete operational stage (ages seven to ten), in which they learn to use symbols to carry out mental activities.

Socially, children in ages three to seven identify with adult models. During ages seven to ten, children begin to be influenced by their peer group, and begin to spend more time with other children. The family continues to be an important influence on the child.

Emotionally, children are beginning to develop a stronger ego to protect their self-concepts and to combat anxieties. They need a stable and loving home environment.

Spiritually, children begin to internalize the morals and ethics of their family and social group.

PHILOSOPHY

The philosophy of early childhood education reflects the nature of the children it serves.

Children at the early childhood level are active physically and mentally. They are curious. They are discovering themselves. They are learning to use language to express themselves. They pass through sequential stages of development.

Yet, there are great differences among children at this age level that must be taken into consideration. Children vary greatly in experiences (home, cultural, economic), in abilities (physically, mentally, socially) and in interests.

Early childhood education must accommodate these similarities and differences. It must be a student-centered approach.

Since learning in the early childhood years is so sequential, the learner’s readiness must constantly be assessed by diagnostic/prescriptive approaches. The learning experiences must begin at the active, concrete, and manipulative levels. Learning activities must be within the child’s readiness level, competency level, and within his/her range of interest.

Early childhood education not only develops the necessary skills for learning later on, but also the attitude toward learning, and most importantly, the child’s self-concept. Since the school cannot alone be responsible for the development of the child’s self-concept, a strong communication link must be set up between the school and the home.

Primary students need frequent opportunities to succeed. This is best achieved when primary students interact within the classroom among familiar peers.

EDUCATIONAL GOALS

To assist in the attainment of the Educational Goals of West Virginia, those responsible for early childhood education must:

    1. Facilitate mastery of basic skills needed for communication – reading, writing, speaking, and listening – and of basic skills needed for the use of numbers.
    2. Develop each child’s competencies in perceptual skills, physical coordination, body mastery and healthful living.
    3. Promote curiosity, critical thinking and problem-solving.
    4. Develop attitudes and beliefs necessary to function in a technological and democratic society and to recognize the worth of each individual, and of all racial and ethnic groups.
    5. Develop career awareness, interpersonal relationships, and self-direction through active involvement with people, materials, and environment.
    6. Develop students’ aesthetic awareness, expression, appreciation, and creativity.
    7. Personalize instruction based on diagnostic-prescriptive results that offers an equal educational opportunity for all learners.
    8. Provide processes whereby learners receive multiple services to facilitate a successful transition from the home to the school and from early to middle childhood.
    9. Provide close interaction between the home and school through a program for parent education and parent involvement in the child’s learning environment.
    10. Provide continuing education programs for professional personnel that facilitate implementation of the goals, objectives, instructional processes, and evaluation procedures that meet the needs of the early childhood learner.

PROGRAM OF STUDIES

The early childhood curriculum of Mineral County Schools shall include the following areas:

    • Reading and the Basic Communication Skills of Listening, Speaking and Writing
    • Mathematics
    • Social Studies
    • Physical and Motor Development
    • Health/Safety Education – Bus/School Safety
    • Science Education
    • Creative Arts Education (Art, Music, Creative Dramatics)
    • Computer Education
    • Developmental Guidance

CURRICULAR GOALS

To progress towards attainment of the Educational Goals of West Virginia, following are the goals for early childhood education in each of the curricular areas:

       
      Reading and the Basic Communication Skills of Listening, Speaking and Writing
 

The early childhood reading and basic communication skills curriculum will provide experiences and instruction with:

      1. develop readiness for the development of the skills needed for effective communication with peers and adults.
      2. foster appreciation of literature and encourage reading and writing for pleasure and enrichment.
      3. reading, vocabulary, comprehension, library-media, and study skills.
      4. listening, speaking and writing skills in a functional and a creative context.
      5. deliver remedial and/or enrichment experiences as indicated by student achievement.
  • Mathematics

The early childhood mathematics curriculum will provide:

    1. Concrete and pictorial experiences with pre-number concepts including classifying, comparing and ordering.
    2. Concrete, pictorial abstract experiences in the use of numbers including counting, ordering, measuring, organizing data, discovering patterns, and numeration.
    3. Concrete, pictorial and abstract experiences for concept development and computation using addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.
    4. Concrete and pictorial experiences with geometric concepts.
    5. Concrete, pictorial, and abstract experiences in the development of problem-solving skills.
  • Social Studies

The early childhood social studies program will provide experiences:

    1. in the management of self and time where the skills of sharing, working and playing cooperatively and the ability to deal with change, conflict and ambiguity are developed.
    2. through multi-disciplinary units of work dealing with the child’s environments—political, social, economic, and physical—with attention to related historical events.
    3. for learning how cultural diversity enriches individuality and builds awareness that individual and group differences contribute to the richness of life’s experiences.
    4. to provide learners with initial investigative skill development related to problem-solving through:
      1. information acquisition which includes observation, using questions and using prepared sources.
      2. Information processing which includes comparing, classifying, conceptualizing, inferring, and imagining.
  • Physical and Motor Development

The early childhood physical/motor development program will provide experiences and instruction which promote:

      1. body and space awareness.
      2. use of fundamental locomotor and non-locomotor movements.
      3. coordination of body parts.
      4. Development of perceptual skills.
  • Health/Safety Education

The early childhood health/safety curriculum will provide experiences which:

      1. promote behaviors, attitudes, and understandings favorable to optimal health, safety, and feelings of security.
      2. promote development of a well-integrated personality with a realistic acceptance of one’s capacities and limitations.
      3. clarify accurate concepts and dispel superstitions and misconceptions concerning personal and public health matters and life styles.
      4. allow children to perceive cause and effect and to take preventive or remedial steps to length life and to improve the quality of living.
      5. provide instruction in bus safety.
  • Science Education

The early childhood science curriculum will provide experiences in the:

      1. recognition of basic properties of matter and change, as well as major scientific facts, laws, structures and concepts.
      2. classification of objects, actions and phenomena.
      3. quantification of data.
      4. interpretation of the significance of meaningful arrangements of events and information.
      5. prediction of outcomes from trends in events and information.
  • Creative Arts Education
 

The early childhood creative arts program should provide experience in art education, music education, and creative dramatics.

      1. The early childhood art education curriculum will provide experiences in:
        1. creating, experimenting, symbolizing facts, communicating ideas, and feelings.
        2. exploring and experimenting with a multitude of materials and processes in an atmosphere in which the creative process involved is of greater value than the end product of that process.
        3. experimenting with texture, color, lines, shapes, and sizes and using various media and techniques.
        4. developing skills in the use of materials and tools used for creative experiences.
      1. The early childhood music curriculum will provide experiences in:
        1. active involvement with authentic music and creating original music.
        2. developing concepts of the basic elements of all types of music.
        3. performing music, including singing, playing rhythm instruments and pitched instruments, moving to music and, as a tool which facilitates all of these, using musical notation.
        4. developing musical understanding leading to appreciation.
        5. analyzing music both aurally and visually.
      1. The early childhood creative dramatics curriculum will provide:
        1. opportunities for the coordination of locomotive and manipulative skills focusing on the learner’s power to use ideas and language through creative activities.
        2. experiences for imitative and imaginative representation of people and roles.
        3. varied experiences with costumes, accessories, and props that direct learners toward innovative encounters, both in and out of the classroom.
        4. experiences stimulated by creating and/or recreating favored stories by using puppets, flannel board figures and other materials.
  • Computer Education

The purpose of computer education at the early childhood level is to provide students instruction in the use of computers as an educational tool.

The early childhood computer education program will provide students with the opportunity to:

      1. gain understanding of the purpose and use of computers in society.
      2. gain skills necessary for basic operation of a computer, e.g., use previously developed software.
      3. use computer-assisted instruction.
  • Developmental Guidance

The early childhood developmental guidance program is designed to guide and assist students in their social, emotional, and spiritual growth during the early childhood years.

The early childhood developmental guidance program will provide individual and group counseling and guidance experiences in:

      1. personal development
      2. social skills
      3. family relationships

MIDDLE CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

The middle childhood program is for children between the ages of 10 to 14, and covers the period between childhood and adolescence.

THE LEARNER

Students between the ages of 10 and 14 have special educational and psychological needs which clearly identify them as a unique group. The uniqueness of this "transescent period" is characterized by stages and changing rates of social, emotional, and intellectual development, and physical growth. Many times transescents are plagued with peer pressure, self-doubt, and a need for personal autonomy. Developmental and growth changes manifest themselves in needs which are unique to the transescent. There is an important need to be accepted for what he/she is and to be understood. The transescent has a great need for peer acceptance. The transescent must adjust to a dramatically changing body, become aware of self as a developing individual, acquire social interaction skills, and seek an appropriate balance between dependence and independence. The transescent must develop the ability to think abstractly, acquire decision-making skills, and participate in exploratory experiences which broaden an awareness of the world.

PHILOSOPHY

The middle school program is designed to serve as a bridge between childhood and young adulthood, to provide optimum development for a varied group of students, and to establish an environment in which the learner is the most important person in the school. Teachers in the middle schools must view education as a process rather than a product. An appropriate mixture of structure and openness must be provided, and the curriculum must be designed to personalize learning for each student. The middle school program must be designed to relieve the pressure of interscholastic sports, inter-individual competitive grading, solely academic disciplines, rigid grouping, excessive use of standardized tests, formal social events, etc. The middle school program must be designed to meet the needs and interests of students in a period of tremendous physical, social, emotional and intellectual growth and change. The accomplishment and success of the middle school program demands change. The accomplishment and success of the middle school program demands cooperation and involvement of the school, home, community and the transescent.

EDUCATIONAL GOALS

The basic education components of the middle school program are as follows:

    1. A concentration of time and effort on basic skills in reading and mathematics.
    2. A major emphasis on problem-solving skills and on development of independent study skills.
    3. Block scheduling, in schools or appropriate size, in which teams of students are assigned to a space with a team of teachers who then are responsible for scheduling within the block.
    4. A communication arts interdisciplinary block. Students are assigned to a team of teachers for an extended period of time, in which the academic areas of social studies, English/language arts, reading and library media, as well as independent study skills are taught.
    5. A strong physical education program for every child, which deletes the stress of interscholastic sports, and provides a varied intramural program.
    6. An exploratory program which provides students with an opportunity to explore wide areas of interest in non-competitive and non-graded activities.
    7. Advisory groups. Students are assigned to a teacher-advisor with whom a supportive relationship can be established. The advisor works with students to strengthen their self-concept, and sense of worth. They also provide academic counseling and home-school communication.
    8. A related arts program, which gives students an opportunity to participate in and explore the areas of art, music, consumer and homemaking, and industrial arts.

The Mineral County Board of Education believes that the middle school program is both desirable and practical for the students and teachers of Mineral County, and will provide the best possible educational program for students.

PROGRAM OF STUDY

The middle childhood curriculum of Mineral County Schools shall include the following areas:

    • Communication Arts
    • Mathematics
    • Science
    • Related Arts (Art, Music, Consumer and Homemaking,

(Industrial Arts)

 
  • Physical Education
  • Health/Safety Education
  • Computer Education
  • Advisory/Developmental Guidance Program
  • Exploratory Studies

CURRICULAR GOALS

The following curricular area goals are designed to progress towards attainment of the Educational Goals of West Virginia:

    • Communication Arts

The middle childhood communication arts program includes reading, language arts, social studies, library/media skills, and exploratory foreign language. It is composed of a three-period block of time. Within this block of time, each student has a regular language arts class daily, a small group basic skills class, and a social studies class in which communication skills are also taught and reinforced.

Individualized and personalized instruction takes place in the small group basic skills class.

A balanced program of communication arts will provide:

      1. Systematic instruction in language arts, including:
        1. word recognition skills
        2. comprehension skills
        3. study skills
        4. functional reading skills
      1. Systematic instruction in language arts, including:
        1. listening skills
        2. oral expression skills
        3. handwriting skills
        4. composition skills
        5. spelling skills
        6. grammar and usage skills
        7. vocabulary development
 
  • 3. Systematic instruction in the development of social studies skills, including:

          1. basic political systems and their impact on members of society.
          2. becoming a responsible citizen.
          3. basic economic systems and their impact on members of society.
          4. significant aspects of the human past.
          5. effects of geographical and environmental relationships on the development of human experience.
          6. multicultural understanding in a pluralistic society.
          7. basic social systems and their impact on members of society.
          8. formulating and communicating ideas and problem solving.
          9. dealing with current cultural and social problems and their impact on the family and individual.
        1. Development of awareness in foreign languages.
        2. Systematic instruction in library/media skills, including:
          1. orientation procedures
          2. locating materials
          3. use of card catalog
          4. book format
          5. reference skills
          6. appreciation of literature
          7. operation of audio-visual equipment and use of materials
        1. Development of active involvement of each student in reading for recreation and personal development.
        2. Development of career awareness in areas involving communication arts.

    Mathematics

    The middle childhood mathematics program is designed to complete the mastery of basic skills begun in the early childhood program, and to lay a broad foundation for the more sophisticated and theoretical mathematics of the secondary school.

    The program covers the broad spectrum of abilities present in middle school students. A process of diagnosis and remediation is followed at every level. Attention is given to students who are deficient in basic skills. Programs also exist for those with high abilities in mathematics. This includes Algebra I where appropriate for 8th graders, and the CEMREL program for highly capable 7th and 8th grade students, where appropriate.

    The middle school mathematics program will provide systematic instruction in:

        1. operations/computations with number with accuracy and efficiency
        2. understanding of number concepts
        3. understanding of geometric concepts
        4. understanding of algebraic concepts
        5. experience with measurement activities
        6. basic experiences with probability and statistics
        7. estimation, both in numerical and measurement situation
        8. mathematical problem-solving
        9. career awareness in areas involving science and health education areas

    Science Education

    The middle childhood science program is designed to survey basic concepts in all fields of science, including earth science, life science, physical science, and outdoor education with an emphasis on practical applications and derivations of these concepts. The program explores the "WHY" of everyday happenings.

    A variety of teaching methods is used, including a multi-media approach, scientific lectures, demonstrations, independent study, student projects, individualized study, field trips and Outdoor School. There is an emphasis on "learning by doing," and an activity and laboratory approach to science.

    The middle school science program will provide systematic instruction in:

          1. Recognizing and applying facts, concepts, laws and theories.
          2. Classifying objects, actions, or phenomena according to similarities and differences.
          3. Quantifying information.
          4. Recognizing and interpreting meaningful arrangements of information.
          5. Predicting an outcome from trends, using inference, extrapolation or interpolation.
          6. Constructing a hypothesis.
          7. Developing, analyzing, and conducting an experimental design.
          8. Exploring areas of earth science, life science, and physical science.
          9. Developing an attitude towards the scientific method as a tool for problem solving in the real world.
          10. Developing career awareness in science areas.
      • Related Arts

    The middle childhood related arts program is designed to give students a basic background in art, music, industrial arts, and home economics, and to allow exploration of fields of particular interest in these areas.

    Fifth grade students are served by resource art and music teachers. The sixth grade program consists of nine weeks of each area of study. The seventh and eighth grade program is made up of nine-week electives.

    The emphasis is on learning by doing.

    The middle school related arts program will provide systematic instruction in:

          1. basic skills and appreciation of art
          2. knowledge and appreciation of general music
          3. basic skills in performing instrumental music
          4. basic skills in performing choral music
          5. basic understandings and skills in consumer and homemaking
          6. basic understandings and skills in industrial arts and technology
          7. informed and meaningful career and occupational awareness
      • Physical Education

    A strong physical education program is essential during the middle school years. The program provides instruction in basic skills, lead-up skills, organized team sports, individual and dual sports, and special activities.

    Classes are co-educational. Students are able to learn and develop skills at their own rates. Every effort is made to reinforce a positive self-concept in each student.

    An intramural program is conducted as an outgrowth of the physical education program. The purpose is to provide a wide variety of organized physical activities for as many students as possible. During the intramural program, students apply the skills learned in physical education classes. Provision is made for the development of wholesome attitudes toward physical fitness, fair play, sportsmanship, and respect for the rights of others.

    The middle school physical education program will provide systematic instruction to:

        1. promote physical growth, development and maintenance through activities that develop strengths, vigor, vitality, skills and coordination.
        2. contribute to the development of social competencies in the areas of relationships with others, cooperation, competition, tolerance, ethical character, and recognition of the fundamental worth of each individual.
        3. promote emotional development through contributions toward individual adjustment, emotional self-mastery, adjustment to others, relaxation, and confidence.
        4. provide healthful and integrating recreation for the present as well as to lay a basis for wholesome recreation in the future.
        5. promote healthful living through contributions to health habits and attitudes.
        6. provide competency in useful physical skills and management of the body.
        7. develop career awareness in areas involving physical education.
      • Health/Safety Education

    The middle childhood health program is designed to give students basic concepts in the areas of safety and first aid, physical growth and development, consumer health, substance use and abuse, personal health, family life and health, disease prevention and control, behavioral health and nutrition.

    The middle school health program will provide systematic instruction in:

        1. safety and first aid knowledge and skills
        2. physical growth and development
        3. knowledge of body systems
        4. consumer health
        5. substance use and abuse
        6. personal health
        7. family life and health
        8. disease prevention and control
        9. behavior health
        10. nutrition
      • Computer Education

    The purpose of computer education at the middle childhood level is to provide students instruction in the use of computers as an educational tool.

    The middle childhood computer education program will provide students with the opportunity to:

        1. understand the purpose and use of computers in society
        2. gain skills necessary for basic operation of a computer, e.g., use previously developed software
        3. use computer assisted instruction
      • Advisory/Developmental Guidance Program

    The advisory program is designed to guide and assist students in their social, emotional, and spiritual growth during the middle childhood years. The advisory group provides a secure setting in which students may establish a special supportive relationship with a significant adult. The advisor helps students develop wholesome self-concepts and personal understandings which aid them in effectively understanding and coping with relationships with others, with social and academic decisions, and other pressures with which they are confronted.

    The foundation of this program is the assignment of a faculty advisor to each student during the sixth, seventh and eighth grades. The developmental guidance program for fifth grade students is conducted by the school counselor. A cornerstone of the program is communication between home and school.

    The middle school developmental guidance program will provide systematic instruction in:

        1. Personal Development
        2. Academic Adjustment
        3. Social Skills
        4. Family Relationships
        5. Careers
      • Exploratory Program

    The exploratory program is designed to allow exploratory activities for children in the middle childhood years. The activities are added enrichment that would allow the student to explore and develop new interests in a non-graded situation. Exploratory offerings should be diverse, without duplicating the regular school program. The offerings should be educationally structured, but enjoyable for the students.

    Exploratory offerings are built into the curriculum on a nine-week elective basis.

    The middle school exploratory program will provide:

        1. A variety of experiences based on student interests and needs.
        2. Exploratory experiences in areas beyond the regular school curriculum.
        3. Non-graded experiences, in which students can explore areas of interest without fear of failure.

    ADOLESCENT EDUCATION

    The adolescent education program is designed for children in grades 9-12 (approximately ages 14-19).

    THE LEARNER

    Adolescence is the period of time when children complete their growth into adulthood—physically, mentally, socially, emotionally, and spiritually.

    Physically, students enter adolescence in various stages of development along their path to physical maturity, and leave adolescence for the most part as physically mature adults. During this period, adolescents undergo much physical stress and change while completing their physical growth and development. These factors must be considered in any educational program for adolescents.

    Mentally, students pass through the last great spurt in brain growth, and become much more capable of handling abstract concepts. Their mental development and the kind and quality of instruction in this period become critical, since for many, this will be their last formal education.

    Socially, adolescents are developing their role with their peers, which is leading them to the development of their role in society. They are forming social self-concepts which will be with them as they enter adulthood. These are critical years for developing self-respect, respect for the worth of others, and skills for good citizenship in society.

    Emotionally, adolescents are on a "roller-coaster," learning to adjust to their own developing minds and bodies and the tremendous peer pressures of peer pressures of adolescence. They are learning self-knowledge and self-control of their emotional state of being.

    Spiritually, adolescents are questioning values---their own and others. They are developing belief systems and a personal philosophy which will guide them the rest of their lives.

    PHILOSOPHY

    The philosophy for adolescent learners in Mineral County must reflect the values and expectations of the society it serves. It advances the most cherished ideals in American democracy.

    INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM

    The instructional program must be based upon the characteristics and needs of adolescents, and upon sound education processes. The program must be flexible. Programs and courses should be demanding to the extent that students are being challenged to do the very best work of which they are capable. Programs and procedures must be humane, with students being given respect and assistance in meeting their needs.

    The instructional program will reinforce and extend basic skills while developing critical thinking, problem-solving skills, and other higher level thinking skills.

    REQUIRED STUDIES

    There shall be a required program of essential studies, giving students a strong background in reading, writing and speaking skills, mathematical abilities, knowledge of scientific facts and methods, knowledge and understanding of social studies, physical education, and an appreciation of the arts. Provisions for assuring the competence of each individual shall be made within the basic program in the following areas: adaptive instruction (for students functioning well below their ability levels), and accelerated instruction (for the most capable students).

    ELECTIVE COURSES

    A broad variety of electives will be offered from general learnings, special interests, and career preparation categories in order to serve the needs, interests, background experiences, and career choices of all students. Students will be guided toward making wise choices of elective offerings so that they may keep their future options as open as possible.

    The objectives for each elective course should be clearly stated, the content carefully described, the requirements for the completion of the courses defined, and the group(s) for which the course would be appropriate should be designated.

    Offerings in the elective program should be appropriate so that each student can be successfully in his/her high school experience. They should be broad and varied so that students may be able to meet the complex demands of society in the future. The elective program should be balanced with offerings in academic areas, vocational areas, the arts, physical well-being, and personal development areas so that students may obtain a well-rounded education.

    EDUCATIONAL GOALS

    To assist in the attainment of the Educational Goals of West Virginia, those responsible for adolescent education must:

      1. Provide for the educational needs of all learners.
      2. Conduct program needs assessments and evaluations as on-going processes.
      3. Provide a variety of courses and components within courses specifically designed around the seven goals.
      4. Use a variety of methods and materials, including a diagnostic/prescriptive model when applicable.
      5. Provide adequate qualified educational, support and service personnel.
      6. Provide continuing education programs designed to assist educational, support and service personnel in implementing the educational goals.
      7. Provide a functioning communications system between the school and the learners, parents, county administration, community, and State Department of Education personnel.
      8. Provide adequate facilities for conducting the adolescent educational program.
      9. Provide adequate funding to underwrite the adolescent educational program.

    PROGRAM OF STUDIES

    The adolescent curriculum of Mineral County Schools shall include the following areas:

      • Art Education
      • Computer Education
      • Developmental Guidance
      • Driver Education
      • English Education
      • Foreign Language Education
      • Health/Safety Education
      • Mathematics Education
      • Music Education
      • Physical Education
      • Science Education
      • Social Studies Education
      • Vocational Education

    ART EDUCATION

    A sequential program of study in art is essential for a balanced high quality education. The skills and concepts taught in art are the basis for future learning and communication. Through art the student learns to see, produce, appreciate and judge the designs, patterns, and images of our society and past civilizations. Art is a linking agent which helps students to draw comparisons, establish values, and effectively communicate and express ideas.

    The art education program for adolescents will include systematic instruction and experiences in:

      1. elements of design
      2. principles of design
      3. history of art
      4. appreciation of art
      5. psychomotor art production skills
      6. career decision-making
    • COMPUTER EDUCATION

    The purpose of computer education in the schools is to provide students instruction in the use of the computer as an educational tool. The use of computers is being integrated into every facet of American life; and therefore, students must be given the opportunity for gaining skills for using computers both in everyday life and on the job.

    The adolescent computer education program will provide students opportunity for systematic instruction in:

      1. The basic operation of the computer in order to be able to use previously developed software;
      2. The use of the computer as an educational aide in all programs;
      3. The application of computers in each program of study in which they are enrolled;
      4. Skills necessary for individual computer programming;
      5. Career awareness of opportunities in computers.
    • DEVELOPMENTAL GUIDANCE

    The adolescent education developmental guidance program is designed to continue the program begun at the early childhood level through the middle childhood level of assisting students to continue developing socially, emotionally, and spiritually throughout the adolescent years. This is done by providing individual and group counseling and guidance activities in:

      1. Personal growth and self-understanding
      2. Interpersonal relationships
      3. Decision-making and problem solving techniques
      4. Educational and career planning

    These areas are also integrated into all programs of study. Career education is integrated into all programs of study and also offers an elective course Career Exploration.

    • DRIVER EDUCATION

    The driver education curriculum is offered for students to learn to drive safely.

    The driver education program will provide systematic instruction and experience in:

      1. safe driving skills
      2. safe and legal operation of an automobile
      3. proper attitudes as a safe driver
    • ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS EDUCATION

    The program area of English/Language Arts is the most basic skill. It is the basis for success in all curricular areas, as well as in later life.

    English/language arts is required at every grade level. Students in adolescent education are required to take English all four years of high school. The program in the high school includes reinforcement and extension of basic reading skills, language arts skills, and library/

    media skills. Additional emphasis in the high school program is placed on literature, composition, and critical/logical thinking skills. Since the development of English skills is so critical to future success of students, teachers in all curricular areas are asked to emphasize proper reading and writing skills.

    The English/language arts curriculum for adolescent students will include:

      1. Systematic instruction in reading, including:
        1. word recognition skills
        2. comprehension skills
        3. study skills
        4. functional reading skills
      1. Systematic instruction in language arts, including:
        1. listening skills
        2. oral expression skills
        3. composition skills
        4. spelling skills
        5. grammar and usage skills
        6. vocabulary development
      1. Systematic instruction in the knowledge, understanding and appreciation of literature:
        1. literary genre
      • short story
      • novel
      • drama
      • poetry
      • non-fiction
        1. World literature
        2. American literature
        3. British literature
      1. Systematic instruction in library/media skills, including:
        1. orientation procedures
        2. locating materials
        3. use of card catalog
        4. book format
        5. reference skills
        6. appreciation of literature
        7. operation of A-V equipment and use of materials
      1. Development of critical/logical thinking and problem-solving skills.
      2. Development of active involvement of each student in reading for recreation and personal development.
      3. Assistance for students in making realistic occupational and career decisions.

    FOREIGN LANGUAGE EDUCATION

    In today’s world, international understanding is a necessity. The United States needs more people who understand the people of the world, their languages, cultures and institutions. It is vital to our foreign policy, to our defense, and to our economy to develop this understanding as well as the ability to communicate in other languages. As one’s abilities to understand, speak, read, and write a new language develop, one gradually deepens his/her knowledge of the people who use it, of their customs and instructions, and of the significant features (such as geography, economics, politics, history, literature, music and art) of the countries and regions where the language is spoken.

    Modern languages are not necessarily those that are spoken outside the United States, since within our borders there are concentrations of speakers of other languages. In addition, foreign language study includes classical as well as modern languages. Although Latin is no longer spoken, the study of Latin offers students the opportunity to understand the contributions of the Romans to the development of our Western culture and to perceive the thoughts and ideas of other human beings expressed from very different perspectives.

    The foreign language curriculum for adolescent students will include systematic instruction and experiences in:

      1. Oral/Aural communication skills in the particular language.
      2. Written communication skills
      3. Cultural concepts
      4. Awareness of the structure of the language
      5. Critical/logical thinking skills
      6. Effective career decision-making

    HEALTH/SAFETY EDUCATION

    All educators must be vitally concerned with the health of their students. An individual is adequately prepare for effective living when he/she has a well-functioning body, regardless of any handicapping condition, and can make reasonably successful adjustments to life situations. All students shall acquire the skills, knowledge, and understanding necessary for leading a healthy and safe life and only through this acquisition can the student achieve happiness, personal efficiency, and attain life’s goals. Optimum health is essential to living a useful and well adjusted life. It provides a basis for successful social and family living. It aids in personality development, contributes to vocational success, and helps one to use leisure time wisely.

    The adolescent health program will provide systematic instruction and experiences in:

      1. safety and first aid knowledge and skills
      2. physical growth and development
      3. knowledge of body systems
      4. consumer health
      5. substance use and abuse
      6. personal health
      7. family life and health
      8. disease prevention and control
      9. behavioral health
      10. nutrition
      11. critical/logical thinking skills
      12. career decision-making
    • MATHEMATICS EDUCATION

    The mastery of mathematics is fundamental for citizens to effectively interact with society. Today’s technological society requires daily use of such skills as problem solving, estimating, interpreting data, measuring and computing. Mathematics is essential in nearly all activities—in the home environment, at the market place, during recreational activities, and on the job. Therefore, focus must be placed upon the learner as a future citizen utilizing mathematics in real work situations. The mathematics program herein is built upon a program of study, areas of study, and specified learning outcomes approved by the West Virginia Board of Education.

    The program for adolescent students provides opportunities or all students—those who need remediation in basic skills, those who need specific mathematical skills for a vocation, those preparing for college, and those needing practical mathematical skills for everyday life.

    The mathematics curriculum for adolescent education will provide systematic instruction in:

      1. operations/computations with numbers with accuracy and efficiency
      2. number concepts
      3. geometric concepts
      4. algebraic concepts
      5. experience with measurement activities
      6. basic experiences with probability and statistics
      7. estimation, both in numerical and measurement situations
      8. mathematical problem-solving
      9. critical and logical thinking skills
      10. mathematical skills for effective functioning in society
      11. mathematical skills necessary for vocational success
      12. effective career decision-making
    • MUSIC EDUCATION

    Assisting young people to develop musical understanding, skill and appreciation is a function of the educational system which seeks to provide for the needs and interests of all of the young people within the society. The development of mass media has brought music of all types to every area of our country and to every segment of society. Music is a part of our environment—it is available in the home; in the concert hall; in offices, elevators, and shopping centers. For many it is a vocational or avocational pursuit; for others it is a recreational or leisure activity. Therefore, the program of music education in the schools must provide opportunities for each student to acquire knowledge of music, skill in performing music and the positive attitudes toward music which will serve him/her throughout life.

    The music education program for adolescents will include systematic instruction and experiences in:

      1. instrumental performing skills
      2. choral performing skills
      3. appreciation of music and its place in society
      4. critical/logical thinking skills
      5. effective career decision-making
    • PHYSICAL EDUCATION

    The physical education program for adolescent students is focused on development of skills, knowledge, and attitudes concerning physical health and well-being that will be a permanent part of each student’s life. A healthy body is one of the keys to a successful and happy life, and knowledge or and desire to maintain good health habits and remain physically fit is one of the most important things a student can learn.

    The adolescent education program will provide systematic instruction and experiences to:

      1. Promote physical growth, development, and maintenance through activities that develop strength, vigor, vitality, skills and coordination.
      2. Contribute to the development of social competencies in the areas of relationships with others, cooperation, competition, tolerance, ethical character, and recognition of the fundamental worth of each individual.
      3. Promote emotional development through contributions toward individual adjustment, emotional self-mastery, adjustment to others, relaxation, and confidence.
      4. Provide healthful and integrating recreation for the present as well as to lay a basis for wholesome recreation in the future.
      5. Promote healthful living through contributions to health habits and attitudes.
      6. Provide competency in useful physical skills and management of the body.
      7. Establish goals for lifelong physical fitness and active leisure time.
      8. Make effective career decisions.
    • SCIENCE EDUCATION

    Science is a process, a method of problem solving, and concept development. The teaching of science requires a curriculum and an instructional strategy which will develop cognitive skills, enhance scientific literacy, and provide for the affective needs of the student and society.

    Science is learned best within an instructional setting which fosters inquiry, discovery, and active learner involvement. The majority of instructional time must be activity/laboratory oriented.

    The science program for adolescent students includes opportunities to obtain basic under-standings and knowledge necessary for success in everyday life and also academic science courses for those planning on advanced studies in science. Science at the adolescent level should be basically laboratory- and activity-oriented.

    The science education program for adolescents will provide systematic instruction and experiences in:

      1. Recognizing and applying facts, concepts, laws and theories.
      2. Classifying objects, actions or phenomena according to similarities and differences.
      3. Quantifying information.
      4. Recognizing and interpreting meaningful arrangements of information.
      5. Predicting an outcome from trends, using inference, extrapolation, or interpolation.
      6. Constructing a hypothesis.
      7. Developing, analyzing and conducting an experimental design.
      8. Developing critical and logical thinking skills.
      9. Providing science skills, understandings, and attitudes for effective functioning in today’s society.
      10. Developing science skills, understandings and attitudes necessary for vocational success.
      11. Assisting students in making effective career decisions.
    • SOCIAL STUDIES

    Social studies education has as its basic purpose the preparation of young people to be humane, informed, participating citizens in an ever-changing, interdependent world. Essential to this purpose is the belief in the worth of each individual and in the individual’s inherent capacity to know, to choose, and to act rationally. This commitment must put the power of knowledge to use in the service of humanity and toward the improvement of the human condition.

    The social studies program includes required classes and reflects concepts from history, geography, economics, political science, sociology, anthropology, psychology, and the humanities. Possession of a strong knowledge base and of the ability to use the skills characteristic of these disciplines should enable the student to solve problems, make responsible decisions, and function effectively within a pluralistic society.

    The social studies program for adolescents will provide systematic instruction and experiences in:

      1. basic political systems and their impact on members of society.
      2. becoming a responsible citizen.
      3. basic economic systems and their impact on members of society.
      4. significant aspects of the human past.
      5. effects of geographical and environmental relationships on the development of human experience.
      6. multicultural understanding in a pluralistic society.
      7. basic social systems and their impact on members of society.
      8. formulating and communicating ideas and problem solving.
      9. dealing with current cultural and social problems and their impact on the family and individual.
      10. critical/logical thinking skills.
      11. effective career decision-making.
    • VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

    Vocational programs are conducted at the secondary and adult levels to prepare youth and adults for employment and for work in the home. Programs also include the preparation of persons for entrepreneurship and for key volunteer work needed by the community. While vocational programs are not designed to prepare people for work in occupations for which a baccalaureate degree is required, vocational programs should not hinder movement into such preparation for employment.

    When particular skills can be learned more effectively on the job, it is vocational education’s responsibility to arrange and coordinate on-the-job training and relate it to in-school learning. Other job preparation is provided by vocational education through formal classroom or laboratory instruction. Often, the most effective preparation is a combination of classroom and laboratory instruction followed by on-the-job training.

    Vocational education also has a major role in orienting people to the world of work. Orientation emphasizes career development and provides knowledge of labor markets, career patterns, working conditions, and the advantages and consequences of different work attitudes and work habits.

    The vocational program consists of elective offerings in the following areas: vocational agriculture education, business and office education, distributive education services, health occupations education, consumer homemaking and occupational home economics, diversified and capstone cooperation programs, industrial and technical education, career/

    prevocational exploration and industrial arts.

    The vocational curriculum for adolescents will provide systematic knowledge and experiences in:

      1. job entry skills needed in an occupation
      2. basic skills for vocational applications
      3. desirable attitudes for vocational success
      4. critical/logical thinking skills
      5. career decision-making
      6. job-seeking skills

    The following are more specific objectives for each of the elective offerings within the available vocational curriculum:

    Vocational Agriculture Education

      1. To develop agricultural competencies needed to engage in agricultural production or non-production agriculture activities.
      2. To develop an understanding and appreciation of career opportunities in agriculture of the preparation needed to enter and progress in agricultural occupations.
      3. To develop the ability to secure satisfactory placement and to advance in agricultural occupations through a program of continuing education.

    4. To aid in developing the abilities needed to exercise and follow effective leadership in fulfilling occupational, social and civic responsibilities.

    Business and Office Education

      1. Provide the knowledge and skills needed to manage personal affairs and to understand the structure and operation of our business and economic system.
      2. To assist students to acquire marketable skills and knowledge sufficient for initial position and to provide a background for growth in vocational competency after employment.
      3. To assist students in developing occupational intelligence and businesslike attitudes.
      4. To improve the student’s knowledge of spelling, grammar and punctuation.
      5. To help the student develop a personality which will be welcomed in business and society.
      6. To encourage the development of important business traits and attitudes, such as honesty, accuracy, neatness, thoroughness, resourcefulness, and poise.

    Distributive Education Services

      1. To foster and develop attitudes, skills and understanding related to marketing, merchandising, and management.
      2. To develop and understanding of the wide range of social and economic responsibilities which accompany the right to engage in distribution in a free, competitive society.

    Health Occupations Education

    To provide educational experiences necessary for the development of basic knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to be employed in the selected health field.

      1. To develop motivation towards acquiring continuing education in the selected field.
      2. To provide educational programs for updating and improving abilities related to improving effectiveness of the job.

    Consumer Homemaking and Occupational Home Economics

    To stress sanitary habits and conditions conforming to food service regulations.

      1. Emphasize human and public relations techniques to prepare for working with the Public.
      2. Encourage participation of both males and females to prepare for combining the roles of homemakers and wage earners.
      3. Prepare males and females who have entered or are preparing to enter into the work of the home.
      4. Emphasize the following areas in order to meet current societal needs: Consumer education, management of resources, promotion of nutritional knowledge and food use, and promotion of parenthood education.

    Diversified and Capstone Cooperative Programs

      1. To provide related and on-the-job experiences in occupational fields in which formal training is not available.
      2. To provide on-the-job experience for the advanced student who is becoming available for the job market.
      3. To encounter day-to-day work experiences, problems and solutions.
      4. To instill proper attitudes and work relations skills.

    Industrial and Technical Education

      1. Prepare the graduate to enter the job market with entry-level skills and knowledge.
      2. To become productive with a minimum of additional training on the job.
      3. To stress human relations skills designed to advance in to positions of increased responsibility and supervision.
      4. To prepare technicians to work in support of professional positions.
      5. To encourage nontraditional enrollments and avoid sex stereotyping.

    Career/Prevocational Exploration

      1. Be equipped with self-understanding and understanding of educational-vocational opportunities sufficient for making sound career decisions.
      2. Be able to apply educational skills in the planning and preparation for entry into one’s chosen career and progress within the career, or change the direction of one’s career if necessary or desirable.
      3. understand the value of school subjects in terms of their function within and outside the classroom.
      4. Understand the relationship between the function, value and application of educational skills to career development.
      5. Be able to make realistic occupational choices through experiences in working with others and understand the psychological aspects of work as it relates to temperament, personality and values.

    Industrial Arts

      1. To introduce students to skills necessary for occupational selection.
      2. To make students aware of available careers and career choices.
      3. To instill and develop safety and work habits compatible with the job setting.
      4. To develop human relations skills and attitudes which will lead to success within a career.

    ADULT/COMMUNITY EDUCATION

    THE LEARNER

    The term "adult" means any individual who has attained the age of sixteen and is not currently enrolled in a regular adolescent education program. Adults are special learners in the sense that they are active citizens and participants in society. They may be seeking retraining, extension of training, or training to fill in gaps in their education. 

    PHILOSOPHY

    Learning is a continuous life-long process and the education of adults is an integral part of public education. All individuals are persons of worth and dignity and will be provided educational opportunities to advance to their maximum potential.

    EDUCATIONAL GOALS

    Those responsible for adult/community education must:

      1. Provide as much as possible for the educational needs of adults.
      2. Conduct on-going program needs assessments and evaluations.
      3. Provide a variety of offerings for adults.
      4. Use a variety of methods and materials, including a diagnostic/prescriptive model when applicable.
      5. Provide adequate, qualified educational, support, and service personnel.
      6. Provide a functioning communications system between adults and those involved in adult/community education.
      7. Provide adequate facilities for conducting the adult/community education program.

    PROGRAM OF STUDY

    Programs are available for adults in the following areas: adult preparatory, adult part-time, new and expanding industry training, adult basic education and community education. Content and skills in the areas of study can come from any of the following clusters: Agriculture and Agri-business, Business Education, Communications and Media, Consumer and Homemaking, Fine Arts and Humanities, Health, Hospitality and Recreation, Marketing and Distribution, Personal Service, Public Service Trades, and Industry and Transportation.

    CURRICULAR GOALS

    The adult/community program will provide systematic instruction and experience in:

      1. basic skills to function in society
      2. completion of a secondary education for those who have not done so
      3. training that will enable them to become more employable, productive and responsible citizens
      4. experience in areas of interest
      5. personal skills and content for better home management and home life
      6. improved leisure-time concepts and activities
      7. opportunities to develop vocational skills and knowledge
      8. opportunities to develop public-volunteer skills for rescue squads, fire departments, etc.

    SPECIAL EDUCATION

    Special education programs are specially designed instructional programs to meet the educational needs of any identified exceptional student relative to programs to study approved by the West Virginia Board of Education. These programs apply to early childhood, middle childhood, adolescent and adult students between five and 23 years of age prior to September 1 of each school year, unless the student has graduated. The age limits for required services will be 4-23 years effective with the 1986-87 school year, and 3-23 years effective with the 1987-88 school year. Subject to available funds, special education programs and teaching service will be provided for any age in any year.

    The basis for all special education services is that a free, appropriate education for exceptional individuals is a right, rather than a privilege. Decisions on the education of exceptional students shall be made on an individual basis after a thorough evaluation of the student’s strengths and weaknesses.

    Special education programs shall meet identification procedures, general regulations, program area regulations, procedural safeguards, and search and serve process regulations as stated in West Virginia Board of Education Policy 2419, "Regulations for the Education of Exceptional Students." County procedures for implementing these regulations will be detailed in Mineral County Administrative Guide – Programs for Exceptional Children.

    Categorical special education programs are available to students found eligible through the evaluation and placement process. Population definitions and program of study goals are listed below:

    BEHAVIOR DISORDERS

    1. Definition of Population to be Served

    Behavior disordered students manifest behaviors which have a deleterious effect on personal or educational development and/or the personal or educational development of others. Negative effects may vary considerably in terms of severity and prognosis. These behaviors may appear separately or in combination and may be exhibited in the form of acting out behaviors, withdrawing behaviors, defensive behaviors and/or disorganized behaviors.

    2. Program of Student (Goals)

      1. The goal of a behavior disorders program is to provide the instruction and assistance necessary to enable the study to progress developmentally through the approved program of study.
      2. The behavior disorders program includes three (3) major components: behavior management, affective education, and academic instruction.
      3. The program provides an environment that modifies or controls behavior problems, enhances the student’s feelings of self-worth and develops the student’s self-control so that appropriate learning can occur.

    COMMUNICATION DISORDERS

    1. Definition of Population to be Served
    2. Communication disordered students have language, voice, fluency, or articulation disorders which adversely affect their communication skills, educational performance, psychosocial adjustment, or vocational/career potential.

    3. Program of Study (Goals)
      1. to identify children with speech-language-hearing disorders,
      2. to assess and diagnose specific speech and language disorders,
      3. to refer students for medical or other professional attention necessary for the clinical-instructional management of speech and language disorders,
      4. to provide clinical-instructional services to students with speech-language disorders,
      5. to provide indirect and consultative services to parents, teachers, administrators, other professionals, and support personnel, and
      6. to provide a communication development program in the schools to promote the acquisition of adequate speech and language skills in all students.

    DEAF/BLIND

    1. Definition of Population to be Served
    2. Deaf/Blind students have auditory and visual handicaps, the combination of which cause such severe communication and other developmental and educational problems that they cannot properly be accommodated in special education programs solely for the hearing handicapped or for the visually handicapped student.

    3. Program of Study (Goals)
      1. Deaf/Blind students are taught to use a communication system effectively, because so many areas of development depend on the ability to send and receive signals about the environment.
      2. The needs of deaf/blind resemble those of other students. Development must be encouraged in cognitive, motor, and self-help areas.

    GIFTED

    1. Definition of Population to be Served
    2. Gifted students have exceptional intellectual abilities that are evidence of outstanding performance capability, and who, by reason thereof, require differentiated educational programs and/or services beyond those normally provided by the regular school program.

    3. Program of Study (Goals)
      1. Mastery of Basic Learning Outcomes
      2. The intellectually gifted student will have the opportunity to master the basic learning outcomes in all required areas of the curriculum.

      3. Mastery of Extended Learning Outcomes
      4. The intellectually gifted student will have the opportunity to master extended learning outcomes in content areas identified as an area of special need, interest and/or ability. Extended learning outcomes are developed at a higher level of complexity, a higher degree of abstractness, or include topics not in the basic curriculum. They emphasize cognitive skills with particular focus on critical thinking skills.

      5. Advanced Levels of Proficiency in Process Skills

    The intellectually gifted student will have the opportunity to master the following process skills to a greater degree of proficiency than provided in the basic curriculum:

    • Problem-solving skills, for example, inductive reasoning, deductive reasoning, inquiry, scientific method, creative problem solving;
    • Creative thinking skills and behaviors, for example, fluency, flexibility, elaboration, originality, curiosity, imagination, risk-taking and complexity;
    • Independent learning skills, for example, research skills, study skills, individual and group investigative projects, organizational skills, time management;
    • Philosophical inquiry skills, for example, logic, ethics, aesthetics, politics, ontology;
      1. Understanding of Self and Society

    The intellectually gifted student will have the opportunity to develop skills in the following areas: group dynamics, leadership, future-planning, decision-making, socialization, appreciation for human similarities and differences, development of a positive self-concept and self-understanding.

    HEARING IMPAIRED

    1. Definition of Population to be Served
    2. Hearing impaired students are those whose auditory acuity delays prohibit the development of speech, language and academic achievement and are classified as deaf or heard of hearing. The generic term hearing impaired is to include every student with a hearing loss whether permanent or fluctuating that is developmentally and educationally handicapping.

    3. Program of Study (Goals)
      1. To allow hearing impaired children to receive their educational opportunities in the method of communication which they have the inclination to pursue.

    b. To provide special curricula for daily living activities, communication skills, auditory perception/discrimination, adaptive behavior skills, and training in the use of residual hearing.

    EDUCABLE MENTALLY IMPAIRED

    1. Definition of Population to be Served
    2. Mentally impaired students have significantly subaverage general intellectual functioning existing concurrently with deficits in adaptive behavior and manifested during the developmental period.

    3. Program of Study (Goals)
      1. The program places emphasis on the teaching of skills and concepts that are functional, age appropriate and considered to be necessary for performance in out-of-school environments.
      2. Programs for the mentally impaired include learning outcomes encompassing skills which enhance their ability to effectively interact with objects, events, and people across environments.

    TRAINABLE OR PROFOUNDLY MENTALLY IMPAIRED

    1. Definition of Population to be Served
    2. Mentally impaired students have significantly subaverage general intellectual functioning existing concurrently with deficits in adaptive behavior and manifested during the developmental period.

    3. Program of Study (Goals)
      1. The program places emphasis on the teaching of skills and concepts that are functional, age appropriate, and considered to be necessary for performance in out-of-school environments. To accomplish this, a full continuum of programs is to be available at all instructional levels.
      2. Programs for the mentally impaired include learning outcomes encompassing skills which enhance their ability to effectively interact with objects, events, and people across environments.

    PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED

    1. Definition of Population to be Served
    2. Physically handicapped students have physical impairments which may be congenital or caused by accident or disease, resulting in permanent, temporary, or intermittent medical disabilities. These impairments require modification in curriculum, instructional strategies, and/or a need for related services. The type, extent and/or duration of services are determined by the nature of the individual’s disability.

    3. Program of Study (Goals)

    Specialized curricular areas individually considered for a physically handicapped student are: physical, psychological and emotional adjustment to a physical disability, including treatment, care, and maintenance; death and dying; use of prosthetic and orthotic devices, eating, dressing, toileting, physical mobility, and personal hygiene; basic communication (e.g, use of communication devices, bliss symbols, signing, etc.); and specialized curricular areas utilized with associated disabilities.

    PRESCHOOL HANDICAPPED

    1. Definition of Population to be Served

    Preschool handicapped children are those children under the age of five who evidence a significant developmental delay in one or more of the following areas: cognitive, fine and/or gross motor, receptive and/or expressive language, and social/emotional.

    2. Program of Study (Goals)

      1. The goal for the preschool handicapped child is the same as for his non-handicapped peers: the acquisition of skills in all developmental areas, i.e., language, cognition, motor, social-emotional, and in a manner which promotes independence and readiness for academic learning. To achieve this goal, the preschool handicapped curriculum should provide for a program of instruction which emphasizes skill development in an integrated manner, rather than skill development in isolation.
      2. A comprehensive developmental program for preschool handicapped children shall incorporate the necessary related services, i.e., speech-language pathology, physical therapy, occupational therapy, psychology and social services. These services may be provided through interagency contracts/agreements, consultant services and/or direct employment of support personnel.
      3. The service delivery system focuses on preparing a child for the maximum possible participation in a regular educational setting. When a child reaches school age (CA-5), appropriate placement will correspond to the continuum of services outlined in this document.

    SPECIFIC LEARNING DISABILITIES

    1. Definition of Population to be Served
    2. Specific learning disability students have a disorder of one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or in using language, spoken or written, which may manifest itself in an imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, spell or to do mathematical calculations. The term does not include a learning problem which is primarily the result of a visual, hearing or motor handicap, of mental retardation, or of environmental or cultural differences or economic disadvantage.

    3. Program of Study (Goals)
      1. The specific learning disabilities program provides instruction that enables the learning disabled student to achieve the learning outcomes in an integrated, sequential and developmental manner to the maximum extent.
      2. The instructional program addresses the manner in which a child learns, as well as developmental levels.

    VISUALLY IMPAIRED

    1. Definition of Population to be Served
    2. Visually impaired students have a physical deficiency in a visual acuity or a visual field limitation where, even with use of lenses or corrective devices, the child requires modifications of instructional methods and materials or supplementary assistance in order to function and learn. Pupils identified as visually impaired include those with organic impairments such that there is no vision, or visual limitations, which after best correction result in educational handicaps requiring special services and/or materials.

    3. Program of Study (Goals)

    The curriculum or an effective program for the visually impaired is adapted from the general educational program to meet the individual needs of the visually impaired student. The required adaptations are to be based upon the student’s developmental functioning level and readiness for learning.

    AIDS EDUCATION

    The goal of this policy is to assist in the protection of students by providing them with the knowledge and skills necessary to avoid behavior that will put them at risk of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). AIDS prevention education will include instruction in the prevention, transmission and spread of Acquire Immune Deficiency Syndrome. The Mineral County Instructional Program shall include the following components:

    1. INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM
      1. The county provides a comprehensive AIDS prevention education program which has been developed with the assistance of professional personnel, parents, and community representatives.
      2. AIDS prevention education shall be integrated into current programs of study such as health, science, developmental guidance, and social studies at all appropriate grade levels.
      3. The program shall be comprehensive to provide not only knowledge about the disease AIDS, but also have a focus on the behaviors and skills necessary to prevent exposure to the virus.
      4. All high school students will, upon completion of course requirements for graduation, have received appropriate AIDS prevention education. Such instruction shall normally be delivered within the health and science course requirements for graduation. The students who may have completed such classes prior to the implementation of this policy will be provided instruction in the most appropriate class available prior to their graduating.
      5. The AIDS prevention curriculum and materials shall be available for parental examination.
      6. Parents may provide written notice to the school principal to exempt their children from AIDS instruction.
    1. STAFF DEVELOPMENT
      1. Provisions shall be made for all school staff to receive in-service training about the nature of the AIDS epidemic and means of controlling its spread and the role of the school in providing education to prevent transmission.
      2. Educational personnel responsible for classroom instruction shall receive staff development that will enable them to implement effective AIDS prevention education programs.
      3. Educational personnel responsible for delivering instruction shall periodically participate in staff development activities that will provide current information related to AIDS education.
      4. Parents who wish may attend staff development sessions.

    EXTENDED PROGRAMS

    Equal educational opportunities shall be available to all students regardless of where they may reside in the county. If the high school in which they are enrolled does not offer a course they need, students shall be provided the opportunity through independent study, transfers, or advanced enrollment at Potomac State College to complete a course of study not offered at the high school level.

    MINERAL COUNTY EVENING EDUCATION

    The Mineral County Board of Education offers a broad evening program for adults of all ages. The classes are geared to address many problems and interests in the adult world. The classes usually fall into any of seven generalized categories: Vocational Preparation, Consumer and Homemaking, Health and Safety, Public Service, Craft and Recreation, General Education or Life Enrichment and Investigation. The classes are designed to be short-term goal classes which deal with relevant adult topics. Individuals participating in the classes can expect adequate knowledge presentations, appropriate skills instruction, sufficient in-class applications and an adult learning environment.

    Adult education classes are offered through county school facilities. The Mineral County Vocational Center, Frankfort High School, and Elk Garden School serve as the primary centers. Other schools are utilized as adult education centers as localized demand dictates and course-facility needs are available. Adult education activities at public school sites are a joint venture between county adult education administration and local school administration.

    Minimum tuition is charged for the adult evening programs. Tuition offsets instructional salaries, materials costs, equipment usage, administrative costs, etc. The Mineral County Board of Education approved the operation of evening classes with the understanding that no Board funds earmarked for public youth education are available. Tuition must make adult education activities self-sufficient.

    All teachers are required to be fully certified as stated by the Vocational Plan and/or approved by the Mineral County Board of Education (those instructors in vocational classes, etc., may instruct with only permission of the Board).

    In addition to county board adult education activities, the Mineral County Parks and Recreation Commission has an open agreement with the Board to operate various evening and weekend activities in public schools. This agreement is subject to review and approval by the Superintendent and Board.

    All activities, participants, instructors, etc., are governed by any applicable public school policies and laws. Equal opportunity for all interested parties is maintained without regard to any form of discrimination.

    OUTDOOR SCHOOL

    The Outdoor School Program in Mineral County is regarded as a laboratory for direct learning in areas of the conservation of natural resources, the study of natural and social sciences, worthy use of leisure time, health and physical fitness, democratic living, and citizenship. Students participate with parental approval. Parents receive an informational letter about the camping program in which their children are involved.

    All fifth grade pupils are provided the opportunity of attending an Outdoor Day Camp, held at Minco Park.

    A week-long outdoor education experience is provided for each sixth grade student in the county with the emphasis upon active participation in learnings which cannot be experienced within the school. The students are housed in cabins at Minco Park and provided meals at the dining hall.

    A summer science camp is held at Minco Park for 7th and 8th grade students with high ability and/or high interest in science. Students may attend from all Region VIII counties and Garrett and Allegany Counties, Maryland. The program is jointly financed and sponsored by the Mineral County Board of Education, RESA VIII, donations and student fees.

    These Outdoor Camps are designed to supplement and extend instruction in the area of environment education at the individual schools, and to accommodate required daily instruction in an outdoor setting.

    HEAD START

    The Mineral County Board of Education operates a Head Start Program designed for three and four year old children from low-income families. Since this program is federally funded through the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Office of Child Development, 90 percent of the participants must meet the low-income guidelines established by HEW. The remaining 10 percent of the children enrolled may be accepted upon identification of need by the professional staff members of the program. Also, 10 percent of the total enrollment must be children with handicapping conditions or learning disabilities.

    Head Start is a Home/Center Program. The children attend classes in the Center two days per week and the other three days are used for home visits by the teachers and/or aides. The various components provided by the program are education, mental health, health, nutrition, social services and parent education.

    COMPENSATORY EDUCATION FOR THE DISADVANTAGED

    Special instructional programs are provided for educationally disadvantaged pupils under Chapter I of ECIA in qualifying schools of the county. Special emphasis is placed on corrective and tutorial reading and mathematics.

    Classes under this program are kept small in order that pupils may be given more individual attention by instructors.

    Diagnostic reading centers have been established in eligible primary/middle schools of the county in which special materials and techniques are used in teaching educationally disadvantaged pupils. These centers are used to diagnose and correct reading difficulties in pupils.

    The emphasis in working with educationally disadvantaged pupils is placed in the primary grades where the heaviest placement of teacher aides has been made.

    ECIA Chapter II provides funds for special curriculum projects which are designed annually with recommendations from the Chapter II Advisory Committee.

    HOMEBOUND INSTRUCTION PROGRAM

    In order to provide continuation of education for those students unable to attend their regularly scheduled classes because of injury or any other health reason as certified by a licensed physician, the Homebound Instruction Program will serve those who are out of school for at least three weeks or more, but who will eventually return to the regular classroom. The program will be operated with the doctor’s recommendations considered. Instructional policies and conditions will be as conducive to learning as possible.

    The Director of Special Education will arrange for an instructor to visit the home or designated meeting place to furnish instruction as required by law, State Board of Education Policy, and local procedures.

    Referrals for homebound instruction shall be completed by the parent, principal and attending physician. The physician will recommend the length of time the student will be homebound and whether or not the student is physically able to receive home instruction.

    In lieu of home instruction, it is recommended that for absences of less than three weeks that the school arrange for assignments to be sent home to the students.

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    MINERAL COUNTY SCHOOLS: 36 Baker Place, Keyser, WV. 26726      |      Phone: 304-788-4200      |      Fax: 304-788-4204
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